PEPBlog

Welcome! This is a conversation among parents and others who are doing their best to raise healthy, cooperative, thriving children. Raising children to thrive isn’t easy, especially when those children regularly mess up our plans for their success. We learn the art of parenting from each other, and PEP’s blog is here to help—with tips, tools, talk and encouragement—as well as updates about PEP’s many educational programs.

Our bloggers are like our class leaders (many of them are class leaders)—parents who have found at PEP support, inspiration and a sensible road map for the journey. They’ll share their unique perspectives and experiences, connected by their deep commitment to helping you be the parent you want to be. We invite you to join the conversation.

  • 04|11

    Your Whole Family Breakfast Challenge

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  • 04|09

    8 Practical Ways to Equip Today’s Students for Leadership

    Generation iY (i.e., students born since 1990) are different from earlier generations in their decision-making skills, communication methods, values and style. So what does that mean for parents? How can we help Generation iY respond well to the needs of the world around them? Let me suggest some practical ideas: 1. Let them be different […]... read more>>

  • 03|31

    The Art of the Open-Ended Conversation

    Going down this parenting path with my own two teenagers and being a parent educator, I experience and listen to lots and lots of parenting struggles. Of the many tips and tools I know, one has been jumping out at me lately: the open-ended conversation. I think we parents often are looking for a one-stop […]... read more>>

  • 03|26

    Our Kids’ Review of the Can Do Kids Fair

    At the recent Can Do Kids Fair we heard many enthusiastic comments from kids and parents in the halls and collected more from the written evaluations, but at least one parent wrote a detailed review of the fair at Our Kids, a site featuring family activities and resources in the DC metro area. Kathleen Seiler […]... read more>>

  • 03|18

    Putting a Stop to Whining

    It’s a noise that all parents hear sooner or later, because all children whine. So says PEP board member Rinny Yourman, and we know she’s right. In her article “How to Put an END to Whining!” for the local parenting site Activity Rocket, Rinny describes the extremely annoying voices with piercing accuracy and then details […]... read more>>

  • 03|10

    “Good Eats” at the Can Do Kids Fair

    Think your kids wouldn’t go for Root Veggie Stew or collard wraps with lentil spread? Think again. Kids devoured those and other delectable dishes they prepared themselves with the help of teen volunteers at the Can Do Kids Fair last Saturday. Kelly Bradley created the recipes and coordinated the “Good Eats” station at the fair, […]... read more>>

  • 03|07

    Preparing Kids to “Spring Forward”

    With the start of Daylight Saving Time, we’ll have an extra hour of light for outdoor play in the evening, in exchange for the hour of sleep lost this weekend. To help families prepare, we’re re-posting these suggestions from PEP leaders and other experts we published two years ago. This year, you can bring your young […]... read more>>

  • 03|05

    Kitchen Wisdom: How My Kids Stopped Whining and Started Making Lunch

    Recently I wrote an article for Washington Parent about what a great place the kitchen is for parents—you can give your kids high-quality, positive attention and they get to experience the pride of accomplishment and contributing to the family, all while learning to build a salad or scramble an egg. I wrote about this because […]... read more>>

  • 02|25

    Logical Consequences Aren’t Mean–They’re Meaningful (Part 2)

    Logical Consequences didn’t come easily to me (see Part 1), but by copying examples from my PEP class leaders I was getting some encouraging results and feeling more confident—less like a Monster Mommy and more like a Sane, Calm Mommy. But I still yearned to craft a Logical Consequence of my very own. Luckily, my […]... read more>>

  • 02|24

    Logical Consequences Aren’t Mean—They’re Meaningful (Part 1)

    I sometimes hear about the terrible struggles parents have with logical consequences. They usually ask something along the lines of: “What is THE right logical consequence for this particular bit of naughtiness I’m staring at this moment, and how soon can I make it work?!” These questions always take me back to the days when […]... read more>>

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